Make Darby Stanchfield’s Quick and Easy Halibut Recipe

Before starring on the hit ABC show Scandal, Darby Stanchfield grew up fishing with her family in Alaska.” My dad was a commercial fisherman,” she tells Us of how she learned the skill, which she still practices whenever she visits. “My family went to Kodiak last summer, and we caught 700 pounds of fish in two days. I’m the best fisherman of the family — let me tell you!”

Want proof? Watch the Inside My Kitchen video above to see her cook halibut she caught herself.

Darby Stanchfield Inside My Kitchen ScandalDarby Stanchfield at her California home. Marc Royce Scandal's Darby Stanchfield Teases Abby's Big Twist: She's 'Left Holding the Bag'

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Despite her busy schedule, she still loves to cook the majority of her own meals at home, which often means pulling out a family recipe from her back pocket. Stanchfield loves to make this particular dish with whichever type of white fish she has on hand. (Right now, she has quite the selection of filets in her freezer from last year’s excursion.) One other homegrown element to her cooking: a hefty dose of juice from the lemon trees she cultivates in her yard.

Typically, she’ll serve the fish with some sprouted brown rice, but you could also pair it with another Stanchfield favorite: a heaping, vegetable-packed green salad.

Darby Stanchfield Inside My Kitchen ScandalDarby Stanchfield at her California home. Marc Royce

Get the recipe below:

Baked Halibut with Lemon Thyme Pepita Sauce & Artichokes

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 lb of halibut, cut up in individual portions (divided into four portions)

1 can of artichokes (preferably canned in water, quartered)

1 tbsp capers

1 cup sprouted brown basmati rice

Lemon Thyme Pepita Sauce:

1/2 cup raw pumpkin seeds or pepitas

1/4 tsp garlic powder

1/4 tsp onion powder

Juice from 1 whole lemon (Meyer, if possible)

1 tsp Dijon mustard

4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

4 lemon wedges for garnish

Instructions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees, and put the rice on.

Blend all of the ingredients for the Lemon Pepita Sauce with a hand blender or a food processor.

Cook the rice in two cups water until tender (about 30 minutes), then set aside, with lid covered.

In a glass pan, arrange the portions of halibut so they don’t overlap. Drain the artichokes and add 3/4 of the artichokes around the halibut. Coat each piece of halibut with a liberal amount of sauce, top and bottom. Top with capers. Bake in the oven at 375 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes for thinner pieces of halibut. For thicker pieces, 20 minutes. Check with the fish with a fork. If it separates easily, it’s done.

Plate the halibut piece on a portion of cooked rice. Add artichokes and capers. Garnish with a lemon wedge.

 

A Slower Pace for TV’s ‘Galloping Gourmet’

His trademark gesture of cheerful abandon came in the first few minutes of every show, when he sprinted into the audience, armed with a glass of wine, then ran back and leapt over two dining-table chairs and onto his set without spilling a drop of the wine (thanks to plastic wrap across the top). He invariably ended by slumping into his chair with a little, “Whew!”

Today, at 82, Mr. Kerr is more measured. His leaping days are over, but he still speed walks every morning from his house here, an hour north of Seattle, where he lives with his daughter Tessa and her husband.

He still cooks, too, but will not make himself a hamburger because he believes that two ounces is plenty of meat for a meal and, he said, “you can’t make a decent two-ounce hamburger.”

Finding that place of moderation, though, was hard. In the 1970s, Mr. Kerr lurched from indulgence to asceticism and a denunciation of excess, including his own. Only gradually and with age, he said, did he find his way to a middle ground that allows for some prepared foods, cooked with minimal fat or fuss.

Mr. Kerr on “The Galloping Gourmet” in 1969, snipping a bunch of parsley. Even when he flubbed the cooking, audiences appreciated his positive outlook. Credit Evening Standard/Getty Images

“Wouldn’t one love to think that one always has wound up with the middle way, and is now leading a perfectly balanced life?” he said, laughing and looking out over the Skagit River valley, which he fell in love with years ago because he could see water and mountains and farms all from one perch. “But I had much distance to go,” he added quietly.

There is little doubt, fans and cultural historians say, that Mr. Kerr helped define a certain corner-turning moment in America. He wasn’t the first male chef on television: James Beard got there in 1946. The run of “The Galloping Gourmet” was also relatively brief; CBS canceled the show in 1971 after a car crash in which Mr. Kerr and his wife, Treena, were badly injured, requiring a long recovery.

But in a time of profound anxiety and change — the struggles over civil rights and the Vietnam War were raging as he sprinted onto his set — Mr. Kerr’s upbeat message resonated. Even when he flubbed some kitchen maneuver, and perhaps especially when he flubbed, he reassured his audience that it was going to be all right in the end.

“It was more than hedonism, more like just joy,” said Kathleen Collins, the author of the book “Watching What We Eat: The Evolution of Television Cooking Shows.” “He didn’t seem to worry at all about either the nutritional content, or the whole gestalt of drinking in the kitchen. It was all just about creating a kind of fun atmosphere.”

As a serious cook, Mr. Kerr was on shakier ground. A former White House chef publicly disparaged him, and the New York Times television critic Jack Gould wrote that Mr. Kerr mixed “the informality of the Automat with food brought over from the Four Seasons.”

But for many fans, his mark was indelible.

Bill Fountain, now a high school teacher in Dallas, was barely 5 when Mr. Kerr began galloping. Mr. Fountain said his mother was ill in those years and his father was working two jobs, gone most of the time. Mr. Kerr made cooking seem like something a boy could do.

“He made a huge impression on me,” Mr. Fountain, 52, said in a telephone interview. “I really love cooking, and I think that passion and that joy of cooking came from Graham.”

Mr. Fountain, who produces a fiction podcast with a narrator who solves mysteries involving food, still regularly cooks Mr. Kerr’s jambalaya.

Mr. Kerr plopped a mix of Egg Beaters and whole egg onto a store-bought bean burger and roasted sweet potato at home last summer. Credit Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

“There was this beautiful human quality to him,” Mr. Fountain said, something he also saw in Ms. Child. “He dropped stuff, made mistakes, spilled the oil, but he would always make it O.K., and to this day, I think, how wonderful a thing to instill.”

Mr. Kerr grew up in the kitchen, the son of hoteliers in southern England, but he was an adult before he first made the connection between cooking and entertainment. He was working as a catering adviser to the Royal New Zealand Air Force in 1960, when he suddenly had to fill in for an officer who was to conduct a cooking demonstration. Making an omelet, he also made his audience laugh. A TV cooking show in New Zealand, and then Australia, soon followed.

In his half-hour “Galloping Gourmet” segments, taped in Canada and broadcast in the United States between weekday soap operas (and seen in most British Commonwealth countries as well), the focus was on meat and a lot of it, often as not larded with cream. Vegetables were mere garnish.

The pace was frenetic, and not just on the set. In a kind of travelogue that linked food and foreign cultures — a precursor to Anthony Bourdain’s globe-trotting food programs — Mr. Kerr went around the world 28 times by his count, stopping to master specific dishes that he could then teach his audience.

In 1987, his wife (who also produced his show and came up with the idea of leaping over chairs) had a heart attack and a stroke at age 53, Mr. Kerr blamed himself — and his cooking.

He had already moved by then, he said, to a new way of thinking about food as a result of his religious awakening as a Christian in the mid-1970s, an epiphany partly prompted by the imbalance he had seen in his travels between countries with not enough to eat and those with too much.

His zeal only intensified as Ms. Kerr began her recovery. He raged against nitrites, Alfredo sauces and supersize portions of anything, and became by his own admission an extremist.

“I used to call doughnuts ‘edible pornography,’ and I’d think I was doing the world a favor,” he said. “And I’m sorry about that, I really am. That was a bad time in my life.”

At 82, Mr. Kerr speed walks every morning from his house an hour north of Seattle, where he lives with his daughter Tessa and her husband. Credit Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

He recalled a moment when Ms. Kerr, who died last year at 82, reached her boiling point. He had self-righteously stopped her, he said, from making a bologna sandwich for one of their three children.

“She flung the bologna in my general direction,” he said. In a voice loud enough for the neighbors to hear, he recalled, she shouted, “There is nothing left in this world to eat — nothing, nothing, nothing!”

Mr. Kerr’s new middle path has steered his cooking toward more vegetables and greater convenience, but fewer rules — a message he also preached in his last television series, “Graham Kerr’s Gathering Place,” which ran on public television in the early to mid-2000s.

At dinnertime, he likes to cook for about 30 minutes while listening to National Public Radio. He has written a memoir, “Flash of Silver: The Leap That Changed My World,” and teaches occasional cooking classes from his kitchen, by Skype.

In making lunch for some guests, though, he still sounded like a man on the set, describing every detailed step of a dish he called Graham’s Brunch, often with a quick aside or a joke.

He roasted a sweet potato, and seared a veggie burger in a small amount of olive oil. (MorningStar Farms makes a spicy black bean variety that is his favorite.) Then he folded together a mixture of whole eggs and Southwestern-style Egg Beaters, and topped the vegetable patty with a slice of the sweet potato, the egg mixture, a thin slice of cheese and a dusting of paprika. With this, he served a light green salad and an alcohol-free chardonnay.

These days Mr. Kerr cooks on an electric stove. Gas, he said, was for when you needed speed in a busy kitchen, and he was past that. His television hasn’t been connected to cable or broadcast service for 22 years, he said, so the current multitude of cooking shows is a mystery to him. He has also avoided watching his old programs.

His wife, he said, always advised him against looking too closely at what he did so spontaneously and so well, because studying what worked or what didn’t would destroy the spontaneity — and the joy.

“‘If you watch yourself, you will become an edited person,’” he said, quoting her. “‘Don’t do that.’”
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