Author Archives: admin

Rose McGowan Opens Up About Her Experience With Animal Rescue

Rose McGowan
Rose McGowan attends ‘Charliewood – An Exhibition Of Transgressive Movement’ at Cedar Lake on November 28, 2016 in New York City. Noam Galai/WireImage

Rose McGowan is an ally of furry friends in need. The Charmed alum opened up to Us Weekly about her experience working to rescue animals while attending the Mercy for Animals Hidden Heroes Gala in Los Angeles on September 23.

“The last time I was there, they rescued a group of goats from a backyard butcher,” the 44-year-old animal activist said of working with The Gentle Barn — an organization that aids abused or neglected animals who are sick, lame, scared or too old to be adopted into a private home. “They were starved and malnourished. They named one Rose after me because it came up to me and nestled its head in my arm. So that’s a good memory.”

The star, who was once meat eater, no longer considers it a staple in her diet. “I’ve mostly transitioned out of it [eating meat]. Occasionally I fall off the wagon, usually not,” she told Us. “My diet consists of pasta and yogurt primarily.”

McGowan added that living a meat-free lifestyle has been positive experience. “I feel better for sure,” she affirmed. “I can’t imagine you get many nutrients from meat, other than iron and there are other ways to find that, so you just have to be creative.”

The Planet Terror actress, who now rocks a buzzed hairstyle, confessed that while she tends to shy away from the glitz and glam associated with Tinseltown, she made it a point to show up for defenseless animals.

“We’re here for a good cause, that’s the only reason,” she said of walking the red carpet. “I volunteered at animal shelters and farm animal rescue centers. So it’s a cause I believe in.”

Latest Celebrity News

A Good Appetite: To Transform Your Weeknight Cooking, Turn On the Instant Pot

I bought a multicooker almost a year ago to report on for this newspaper. I figured that after publishing my article, I’d stick the machine in the basement with all the other once-in-a-while appliances (like that electric deep fryer). Then I’d dig it out for braising the occasional large hunk of meat to tender perfection, which, as I immediately discovered, it does better than any other piece of equipment — Dutch ovens and slow cookers included.

Over time, though, the multicooker became so embedded in the rhythm of my everyday cooking that I never unplugged it. I ended up writing my new cookbook for it, “Dinner in an Instant” (Clarkson Potter), as well as an in-depth guide at NYT Cooking. It was the slow cooker that went into storage, where it will remain until my next stoop sale.

What I especially love about the multicooker is its inherent flexibility, pleasing cooks of all temperaments.

Photo

The ribs are first cooked using the pressure-cooker function, then glazed and broiled in the oven to finish. Credit Karsten Moran for The New York Times

If you’re an organized, plan-ahead type of person, you can use your multicooker exactly like a slow cooker. Just use the slow-cook setting with any of your old favorite slow-cooker recipes without even having to adjust them.

Culinary procrastinators, on the other hand, can take full advantage of the pressure setting, which cooks food in minutes instead of hours.

I’m in the latter camp, and so this is my routine: On the way home from work, I stop at the store for some beans or grains or a package of chicken thighs. I throw them into the pot with a mix of interesting seasonings. Then I make a salad while the pot does its thing.

Photo

Coconut curry chicken can be made beginning to end in an hour. Credit Karsten Moran for The New York Times

That’s it. A satisfying dish that would normally take an hour or more is on the table in 20 to 30 minutes.

Now earthy soups, supple stews and luscious braises are within reach for winter weeknights, instead of being relegated to weekends when I have hours to let them simmer. In the summer I can quickly cook beans and grains for salads without heating up the kitchen, or steam artichokes without having to stare at a pot on the stove. I don’t even have to be home.

No matter the season, my basic strategy for using my multicooker on weeknights remains constant: I estimate how many minutes I have before I want dinner to be on the table, and work backward from there.

Often, getting my meal done in the shortest amount of time is simply a matter of how you cut up the ingredients — the smaller the pieces, the faster they will cook. So while a whole brisket or boneless pork shoulder might take 90 minutes to braise under pressure, beef stew meat cut into 1½-inch pieces, or pork ribs cut into two or three rib sections, will be tender in 20 to 25 minutes. Save the large, impressive, company-worthy pieces of meat for when you have more time.

You can apply the same method for dense root vegetables like beets and potatoes. While whole roots usually need about 20 to 30 minutes to cook, slices or cubes take 5 to 10 minutes.

Because I rarely plan ahead, one of my favorite multicooker tricks is to cook dried beans on a weeknight without soaking them first. Of course, you can’t cut them up to make them cook more quickly, but you can select smaller beans. When time is tight, buy lentils, split peas or adzuki beans, which cook from their dried, unsoaked state in under 20 minutes. Save the chickpeas, kidney beans and cannellinis for when you’ve got close to an hour.

NYT > Food